We were together. I forget the rest.
Walt Whitman (via feellng)
Do I contradict myself? Very well, then, I contradict myself; I am large - I contain multitudes.
Walt Whitman (via wordsnquotes)
jtotheizzoe:

explore-blog:

Leonardo da Vinci's life and legacy, in a vintage illustrated pop-up book adapted in animated GIFs

Behold, the GIFtruvian Man!

jtotheizzoe:

explore-blog:

Leonardo da Vinci's life and legacy, in a vintage illustrated pop-up book adapted in animated GIFs

Behold, the GIFtruvian Man!

sethfornea:

#willpower there is a healthy person in all of us fighting our dietary desires! One day at a time! 😘😘😘😘😘

sethfornea:

#willpower there is a healthy person in all of us fighting our dietary desires! One day at a time! 😘😘😘😘😘

palavre:

If you lose your memory you lose yourself.

palavre:

If you lose your memory you lose yourself.

explore-blog:

For Marilyn Monroe's birthday, Open Culture digs up this wonderful photo of her reading Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass – another manifestation of Monroe’s little-known literary side, best embodied in her unpublished poems and penchant for Ulysses.

explore-blog:

For Marilyn Monroe's birthday, Open Culture digs up this wonderful photo of her reading Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass – another manifestation of Monroe’s little-known literary side, best embodied in her unpublished poems and penchant for Ulysses.

Be curious, not judgmental.
Walt Whitman (via wordsnquotes)
jtotheizzoe:

Aerial Astronomy
The Milky Way, captured at 33,000 feet by Alessandro Merga through the window of a 747 on a transatlantic flight from New York to London.
That’s an impressive piece of #starporn.
Of course, it’s got nothing on this amazing photo of an eclipse captured from 44,000 feet, a feat that required a 500 mph plane intersecting with an eclipse shadow traveling at 8,000 mph, resulting in what is still the most amazing feat of astrophotography I’ve ever seen. 
(via APOD)

jtotheizzoe:

Aerial Astronomy

The Milky Way, captured at 33,000 feet by Alessandro Merga through the window of a 747 on a transatlantic flight from New York to London.

That’s an impressive piece of #starporn.

Of course, it’s got nothing on this amazing photo of an eclipse captured from 44,000 feet, a feat that required a 500 mph plane intersecting with an eclipse shadow traveling at 8,000 mph, resulting in what is still the most amazing feat of astrophotography I’ve ever seen. 

(via APOD)

What do you want to know about the science of cheese?

jtotheizzoe:

Because that’s what I’m filming tomorrow!

Mmmmmmmm, sometimes science can be so delicious …

image

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

This timelapse video shows Jupiter as seen by Voyager 1. In it, each second corresponds to approximately 1 Jupiter day, or 10 Earth hours. Be sure to fullscreen it so that you can appreciate the details. The timelapse highlights the differences in velocity (and even flow direction!) between Jupiter’s cloud bands. It is these velocity differences that create the shear forces which cause Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities—the series of overturning eddies—seen between the bands. Earth also has bands of winds moving in opposite directions, but there are fewer of them and the composition of our atmosphere is such that they do not make for such a dramatic naked eye view of large-scale fluid dynamics. (Video credit: NASA/JPL/B. Jónsson/I. Regan)