fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Type 1a supernovae occur in binary star systems where a dense white dwarf star accretes matter from its companion star. As the dwarf star gains mass, it approaches the limit where electron degeneracy pressure can no longer oppose the gravitational force of its mass. Carbon fusion in the white dwarf ignites a flame front, creating isolated bubbles of burning fluid inside the star. As these bubbles burn, they rise due to buoyancy and are sheared and deformed by the neighboring matter. The animation above is a visualization of temperature from a simulation of one of these burning buoyant bubbles. After the initial ignition, instabilities form rapidly on the expanding flame front and it quickly becomes turbulent. (Image credit: A. Aspden and J. Bell; GIF credit: fruitsoftheweb, source video; via freshphotons)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Type 1a supernovae occur in binary star systems where a dense white dwarf star accretes matter from its companion star. As the dwarf star gains mass, it approaches the limit where electron degeneracy pressure can no longer oppose the gravitational force of its mass. Carbon fusion in the white dwarf ignites a flame front, creating isolated bubbles of burning fluid inside the star. As these bubbles burn, they rise due to buoyancy and are sheared and deformed by the neighboring matter. The animation above is a visualization of temperature from a simulation of one of these burning buoyant bubbles. After the initial ignition, instabilities form rapidly on the expanding flame front and it quickly becomes turbulent. (Image credit: A. Aspden and J. Bell; GIF credit: fruitsoftheweb, source video; via freshphotons)

wtf-viz:

Education can go a long way.

wtf-viz:

Education can go a long way.

Sin emoción no hay proyecto que valga
Antonio Damasio, citado en “El viaje a la felicidad”, Eduardo Punset, Destino-booket, Barcelona, 2012, p. 81 (via aabrilru)

jtotheizzoe:

You guys like Doctor Who references?

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I worked a couple of ‘em into tomorrow’s episode of It’s Okay To Be Smart. Why did I do it? 

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And because I’m…

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I kinda got the whole idea to do the video from Amy Pond.

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Yeah, it’s gonna be pretty cool.

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I can’t, that would spoil it. You’re just gonna have to wait until the video is up.

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That’s not very nice. Just be patient.

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Apology accepted. So you gonna watch tomorrow’s video?

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Excellent. Allons-y!

jtotheizzoe:

NEW VIDEO!

Where does the smell of rain come from?

If you said “from the sky,” then congratulations! You are hilarious. But it’s a lot more interesting than that. The pungent perfume that accompanies rainstorms carries special chemical signatures, some born from lightning, some from deep within the soil.

And beyond just being pleasant and nostalgic, those smells are actually useful to some living things, such as telling plants when it’s time to grow, guiding camels across the desert, and even signaling some fish when it’s time to get “romantic”. 

Take a big whiff, because there’s a science storm a-comin’!

jtotheizzoe:

NEW VIDEO! Meet the oldest living things in the world

I hope this video changes how you view a “lifetime”. Every organism you’re about to meet represents a single individual that has been alive for more than 2,000 years. Some of them have been around since before human society even existed.

This week, with the help of artist and photographer Rachel Sussman (whose photographs are collected in the amazing book The Oldest Living Things In The World), I explore some of Earth’s senior citizens. 

A 5,000 year-old pine tree. An 80,000 year-old grove of aspens. A 100,000 year-old meadow of sea grass. Even 500,000 year-old, continuously-living bacteria… how did they get so old? Why do they live so long? Can these survivors survive us? And what others might be out there?

Dip your toe into deep time, and think about this: Is every moment a lifetime? Or Is every lifetime just a moment?

Watch the video below, and if you enjoy, please share and subscribe:

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

This guy is Fridtjof Nansen. He was a champion skier, crossed Greenland in 49 days, set the Farthest North record of his day whilst floating around in the Arctic for 18 months with Roald Amundsen (the guy who beat Robert falcon Scott to the North Pole in 1911) and won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1922, having designed the Nansen passport for thousands of stateless refugees from Russia and Armenia. A badass with a heart of gold, if I do say so myself.

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

This guy is Fridtjof Nansen. He was a champion skier, crossed Greenland in 49 days, set the Farthest North record of his day whilst floating around in the Arctic for 18 months with Roald Amundsen (the guy who beat Robert falcon Scott to the North Pole in 1911) and won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1922, having designed the Nansen passport for thousands of stateless refugees from Russia and Armenia. A badass with a heart of gold, if I do say so myself.

Una vez que adoptamos una nueva visión del mundo (o de una parte de él), inmediatamente perdemos nuestra capacidad para recordar lo que solíamos creer antes de que nuestro pensamiento cambiara.
"Pensar rápido, pensar despacio", Daniel Kahneman, Debolsillo, Barcelona, 2012, p. 265 (via aabrilru)
Nuestra consoladora convicción de que el mundo tiene sentido descansa sobre un fundamento seguro: nuestra capacidad casi ilimitada para ignorar nuestra ignorancia.
"Pensar rápido, pensar despacio", Daniel Kahneman, Debolsillo, Barcelona, 2013, p. 264 (via aabrilru)